Helpful Webinars for
Storage Operators

Switching Web Developers Webinar

What You Need to Know

Separating from your old web development company can open up endless possibilities for revamping your website; however, if you decide to change providers, make sure your new company knows what they're doing. On July 11, StorageAhead's engineering director, Tim Banks, will lead a webinar on taking the right steps when you make the big switch, like combining multiple domains into one, handling 301 redirects and updating your existing content.

Hey everyone, welcome to another edition of the StorageAhead webinars. My name is Tim Banks and I am the VP of engineering here at StorageAhead. Today we’re going to talk about ten things you need to know when switching web developers. This is an important topic for a lot of you that are looking to switch sites, marketing companies, or web development companies. There’s a lot of information that needs to be gathered and talked about and decisions that need to be made when you make that switch from one company to the next. We’re just going to focus on ten of those today. Let’s go ahead and get started. Actually, before we get started, I just wanted to mention: feel free to tweet your favorite quotes, any feedback, and questions to @storageahead with the hashtag #SAwebinars. We’ll be monitoring that throughout the presentation and we’ll grab those questions and comments at the end. Also, feel free to leave any questions in the chat on the right-hand side. We’ll also be looking at those for the Q&A session at the end. Let’s go ahead and get started.

1. Domain Hosting Information

What is it?

Domain hosting information is the account associated with the domain that your site is hosted at. These can be sites like GoDaddy, Network Solutions, and Namecheap.com.

Why is it important?

It’s important because you want to make sure, number one, you own the domain that your company is hosted at online. You want to make sure that the old company that you’re with doesn’t own that domain, so that whenever you decide to make that switch, you get to host your new site at that domain. It sounds very basic but, a lot of times, companies will hold onto certain domains. Also, the account that the domain is registered under houses the settings that decides where the server will point to. Whenever you type in your domain, you know where that site is located. This is called DNS. When switching sites, the location of your server will most likely be changing. Without access to those settings, the locations can’t be changed, and therefore your new site cannot be launched. You’ll also want to make sure that, whenever the DNS is changed to launch that new site, it’s handled in the correct way to allow no downtime when that switch is made. You can talk to your web developer about making sure that happens. Another important DNS setting actually involves email hosting. Most web development companies don’t set up or configure email hosting themselves, and they rely on the existing set-up to continue working. By giving access to these DNS settings in the account, the web development company can then be sure to preserve those existing email settings in order to not cause any email downtime. So be sure to contact them.

What can you do?

First off, you want to contact your current web development company to make sure that you actually own that domain. If you do own it, make sure you retrieve those credentials to get access. It usually just involves a username and password to get access to that. If you already own the domain and you know you have that account and you don’t know what those credentials are, feel free to contact the registrar that you’ve registered it through. So, if you know that you registered that domain through GoDaddy, contact GoDaddy either through their contact form or, if you have an account manager, call them and contact them and they can get you access to that account in order to get those credentials over to the new web development company. Also, inform the web development company of which email provider you are using and if you’re planning on keeping that email provider. A lot of times when you make that switch from one company to the next, you’ll decide to go ahead and change email providers as well. The new web development company needs to understand if you’re going to keep that or change because they’ll have to make sure those DNS settings are set up correctly before they make the new site live.

2. Analytics and Webmaster Tools

What is it?

These are the tools that will give you data and reports on how your site is performing from a traffic and search engine perspective. This is a screenshot here of what Google Analytics can actually give you with some daily visits, different traffic types, and the countries that the visitors are coming from.

Why is it important?

I saw this quote online and though it was pretty good for this section. It says, “Nothing can be improved if it’s not tracked.” How do you know if something is getting better if you’re not tracking anything? Also, Analytics accounts allow you to view data such as total visitors, unique visitors, what devices users are using to access your site, and how visitors are coming to your site – whether that’s an organic search or a direct search (or direct access). Then the Webmaster tools are going to benefit you by allowing you to submit your sitemaps and view crawl errors (when Google and Bing’s websites are crawling your site, if they come across 404 errors or other errors on your site, you’ll be able to view those). You’ll be able to disavow bad inbound links. Maybe there are some spammy sites that are linking to you and you don’t want them linking to you. You can actually tell these search engines, “Don’t use these links to help with my SEO. We don’t want that anymore.”

What can you do?

The first step, obviously, is to get the accounts set up immediately. Don’t wait until your new site goes live to set these up. You want to set these up as soon as you can to start tracking the data on your current site before you make any type of switch. That way, whenever you do make the switch, you’ll have existing data to compare the new site to and that way, like the quote said, you’ll be able to track improvement from the old site to the new site. If you already do have these Analytics accounts set up, a lot of times web development companies will access the Google Analytics data to pull into an admin dashboard. That way you don’t have to log into the complicated Google Analytics dashboard and click your way around. Google Analytics is pretty powerful but it’s also complicated. You need to set up API access inside the Google Analytics account. It’s a pretty basic setup; it’s just setting up a username and password and some permissions, and generally the web development company can help you out getting that set up. Also, like I said before, you want to start gathering data as soon as you can on your current site. Again, you can’t track improvement if you don’t know how your site was performing before.

3. Multiple vs. Single Domain

What is it?

This is going to be for those owners out there that have multiple facilities and they have to make the decision: “Do I want one site that houses all my facilities?” or “Do I want to have a domain for each facility I own?”

Why is it important?

For one, you don’t want to lose link juice by splitting up your site across a bunch of different domains. If you currently have one site that has a bunch of link juice built up and then you build a whole bunch of individual ones, you just split all of that link equity – or link juice – that you built up into a bunch of different sites. Also, this is the one on the list that there’s no right or wrong answer 100% of the time; there’s not a definitive answer. There’s some analysis that needs to be done based on inbound link research, keyword optimization, SEO, and we’ll get into that in the next step.

Multiple Domains

In order to make that educated decision, some analysis will need to be done on the existing site or sites. Instead of saying what you can do, let’s go through a couple examples here and give the pros and cons of each situation. If your company owns multiple locations, there are two strategies when determining how to build your new site. One example is purchasing a domain for each location and building a site for each individual location. The other option is to build a single site with all the locations listed together. First, we’re going to look at having multiple domains for different sites. Let’s say you have three facilities and you’re going to look at building three different sites. You have Site A. For Site A you’re going to have to build unique content for that particular site to generate inbound links for that particular site. And then you have Site B. Again, you’re going to have to write more unique content for more inbound links. Building these inbound links is not an easy process. You can imagine now that you’ve created three different sites that you have to build all this unique content and build your inbound links across. That’s definitely one of the cons: your inbound links and your content are going to be spread across a bunch of different domains. That just leads to more cost and more money spent. The pros are that, for each of these sites, you’re able to have a really focused subject. If your three sites are spread across three regions of the United States, you’re able to focus each of these sites on a particular region and not have to worry about Florida users accessing a Texas facility or Washington users accessing a California facility. They’re obviously not going to want to rent in a completely different state. That’s one of the pros of this approach.

Single Domain

Instead of having your three individual sites (you can still have three different domains), you can have them all redirect to a single site and have that one site. Now you can see: you only have one set of unique content, you only have one target that you’re pushing your inbound links to, and another pro is that you get that brand reinforcement. Now, your brand shows that you own these multiple facilities, you have all this unique content just on one site, you have more indexable pages, your site structure is going to be larger, you have less duplicate content issues, you don’t have to worry about writing unique content (you’re just writing one set of unique content). The thing is, like I mentioned before with the multiple domains, your focus might be spread out a little bit – which could be fine. Again, if your facilities are located in different regions of the United States, that focus is going to be spread just a little bit and they’re not going to be as strong. This is kind of the analysis that you need to go through with your new web development company in making this decision on reviewing the existing site, how you have it structured, and the possibilities moving forward. Whether you want to split up a single domain or merge multiple domains into one, you have to talk with your new company and make that educated decision.

4. 301 Redirects

What is it?

This is a pretty critical item. The 301 status code alerts search engine crawlers that a page has been permanently moved to another location on the site. Human visitors won’t even noticed anything happened but, whenever a crawler gets that 301 status code, they know something has happened and that means a page has moved. Updating these 301 redirects involves updating the .htaccess file. That might sound pretty complicated; you may not know what an .htaccess file is, but this is something you’ll need to ask your new web development company: “Are you setting up these new 301 redirects in the .htaccess file to make sure that the old pages are redirecting to the new?” They’ll understand what you’re talking about if you refer to it that way. Also, another note, I mentioned that this is critical. This is a very important, time-consuming process when switching sites. Due to the time and complexity that it takes to create all these redirects, a lot of web development companies will actually just completely skip this step. You can’t skip this step because you know that your site structure is going to change from one site to the next. You want to make sure that the company you choose to build your new site is taking the time and resources to actually create these 301 redirects and get them implemented correctly.

Why is this important?

Why is this important? We’ve already kind of touched on it, but it’s important to update the pages that are indexed in search engines. Whenever a user searches in Google and they get a search result for your website and they click on that link, you want to make sure that, when your new site is launched, there’s a page still there for that link in the search engine results. For example, if you had an old facility page that was located at “www.example.com/old_facility_page”, the new website will probably have a new URL for that facility. It may be “www.example.com/new_facility_page”. You’ll want to make sure a 301 redirect is set up to go from that old URL to the new URL, so when users land on that exiting URL, they still have a page to view and they don’t get an error saying “this page does not exist anymore”. You’ll also be able to pass along any link juice or link equity that you’ve already built up. Again, using the last example, your old facility page already has a certain amount of link juice built up in Google and if you just abandon that page, you’re going to lose all that optimization that you built up. Adding these 301 redirects allow you to pass on some of that link juice so you’re not abandoning any past SEO that you’ve built up. And then you get to redirect popular landing pages. There’s probably a subset of pages on your site that the majority of users access when they land on your page. This is probably going to change whenever you switch sites, so you need to make sure you understand which pages these users are accessing and give them a page on your new site to view instead of, again, receiving an error. Finally, it reduces duplicate content issues. There are cases where multiple pages on your site will have the same content and you’ll be able to funnel all that into one particular page on your new site. We’ll touch on this topic a little bit later.

What can you do?

One thing you can do: if you want to see how your current site is structured, you can use a tool like Xenu Link Sleuth. What this will allow you to do is type in your URL, hit enter, and this tool will go out and crawl your site and give you a report on the site structure. From there, you can take that site structure and map it to what the new site structure is going to look like and put together a 301 redirection plan that will outline where the existing pages will point to on your new site. Also, Xenu will allow you to find broken links, 404 pages, and just give you a good outline and report of how your current site is structured. You can also use another tool. It says here run a “:site” command in Google, you can also run this in Bing. But what a “:site” command is, if you see the example, “site:storageahead.com”, if you replace “storageahead.com” with your domain and enter that in Google or Bing, the search results will actually just be the indexed pages that your domain has in that search engine. For instance, if you type in a “:site” command and you don’t see any of your facility pages, that’s a cause for concern. Your facility pages should be in these search engine indexes and that will give you a good site structure of how Google and Bing sees your site in their eyes.

5. Sitemap and Robots

What is it?

These are two files that are housed on your machine. Sitemap is a structured file that lets your search engine know about all the pages on your site. Not only does it list all the pages on your site, but you can add in additional information like: how the internal priority of the sites are, your homepage is usually the highest rank, how does your facility page rank to your homepage, how often are pages updated? It alerts these search engines and says “You should come back and crawl this weekly, daily, or monthly because some pages are going to update more than others.” Here’s an example of what Sitemap may look like. You can see here that there are chunks of data where it’s listing URL, the change frequency (so does it change monthly? Daily?) and then the priority. It’s just an internal priority, so you’re giving your site an internal priority structure, letting these search engines have more data about your site. The other is the Robots. So a Robots.txt file is another file that search engines will look at when crawling your site. This file’s a little different. This file will alert crawlers on which parts of your site to access and which parts to avoid. So, for instance, here are a couple of examples. This is a really small Robots.txt file, and you can see here it says “disallow”, so this is telling crawlers, “disallow this URL.” What that one slash means is disallow the whole site. So, “don’t crawl my site”. This is obviously a huge red flag if you see this in your Robots.txt file because this basically says “don’t index any page in my site.” That’s a big concern there. Here’s a more realistic example: this says “disallow the /cgi-bin/, disallow a /tmp/ (so temp folder), disallow a /junk/.” Now, those are pretty cryptic folders and those don’t look like they should really be in a search engine result anyway, so in this particular case they said “disallow these, don’t index these, don’t crawl these”. That’s a good example of a Robots.txt file.

Why is it important?

When building a new site, you’ll most likely have a completely different site structure than your existing site. The URLs are going to change. You can help out these search engines by submitting a new Sitemap once your new site goes live. This will alert them before they come back and crawl, saying, “The site’s changed, and these are the pages I want you to crawl instead of how you crawled the site before.” Then, also, it’s important that that Robots.txt file is paid attention to and not just left by the wayside. Your structure is going to change. Maybe on the old site there was a folder that you were disallowing, saying “don’t crawl this” but on the new site, you actually want that folder crawled or that page crawled. But if you don’t update that Robots.txt file, then that page is never going to get indexed in the search engines, which then you’ll never get users landing on the page or coming to that page from those search results. It’s important to make sure that the Robots.txt file is, in fact, being updated and not just completely ignored.

What can you do?

First, make sure that once the new site is live, a new sitemap is being submitted to Google. Make sure your new web development company is generating that sitemap (creating that structure of your site), then going into the webmaster tools account and submitting that both with Google and Bing. It’s going to help out those search engines crawl your site the next time they hit it. Also, just review that Robots.txt file. Generally, these are located at your domain (so again, “example.com/robots.txt”). They’re always in the same spot, so you can just type that in and see what loads up. Just ask questions. Say, “Are you updating this? Are you paying attention to this?” Just a simple answer – they can return and say “Yeah, we took care of that” – will help reassure that they did take care of that. Just ask questions in that case. If you do open it and see something suspicious, bring that to their attention immediately. If you see URLs, or folders, or pages in there that are disallowing and you know those should be crawled by Google and Bing, and have users hitting those, make sure that they’re aware of that so they can get that page updated.

6. FMS Integration

What is it?

This is an item that’s specific to the self storage industry, but I wanted to touch base with it. It’s only going to be particular to those using facility management software that have some type of integration. This is allowing your new website to talk with the facility management software that you have running in your facility. A couple of examples are SiteLink and CenterShift and they do a great job of this. They have APIs that web development companies can connect to and they can pull different types of data and push data back to the facility management software.

Why is it important?

It’s important because, if you’re planning on having this type of integration, you need to make sure that the API account is set up and correctly working, that all data’s being sent back and forth to make sure that that integration is really tested thoroughly.

What can you do?

In any situation where you’d like the website to talk to your FMS, you’ll need to make sure that account is actually set up inside of your software. The website can’t talk to your facility management software until it has user credentials and the permissions to access that data. It’s important to get this set up as early as possible, too, in order for that web development company to start testing integration. If you wait until the site launches before you plug in these credentials and start pulling your unit data and pushing reservations, there could be issues and you want to make sure you take care of that as soon as possible – as early in the development process as you can. Also, check which version of the software you’re using. Software like CenterShift actually has different versions of API access between the versions of software. They have a CenterShift 3.1 and a CenterShift 4.0, and the actual integration is different and the feature set is different between those two, so it’s good to know as soon as possible which version you’re using so we can start building that integration around those two endpoints.

7. Duplicate Content

What is it?

This is a big SEO issue. It’s really critical, and it’s getting more critical over the past few years – especially with Google. So what is duplicate content? In a basic sense, it’s two or more pages that share the same content. There are three different types of this, though. Getting a little more in depth, there’s three types, there’s: identical (this is where pages have the exact same content, literally word-for-word, picture-for-picture), then there’s near identical (this is where just a few bits of the information have changed, so maybe just the pictures change or just a paragraph is changed. It’s still duplicate content because the majority of it’s still the same), and then there’s cross domain duplicates (this is where there’s actual multiple domains that have the exact same content. Google recognizes this. They’re smart enough to say, “I crawled Site A and I crawled Site B and they have the same content and I don’t know how that happened, but that’s bad, and we’re going to penalize you.”

Why is it important?

Like I just mentioned, you can get penalized. Over the past couple of years, especially with the Penguin and Panda updates in Google, Google has escalated the duplicate content issue from a page-isolated incident into a whole site penalty. What that means is, before, whenever Google detected duplicate content on multiple pages, they just penalized those pages in the search result index. But now they realize that “If there’s duplicate content, there are probably other issues or this isn’t structured right, so we’re actually going to go ahead and penalize the whole site and start reducing the index pages and value for that whole website”. It’s really important to focus on this and not just push it to the side and say, “Well, those two pages have the same. I’ll worry about it later.” Also, the multiple domains, as I mentioned earlier, can be really susceptible to this. If you have multiple domains for your facility and you’re just copying and pasting that content between the multiple domains, that content is going to show up between all of them, and Google’s going to recognize that and possibly penalize you.

What can you do?

There are a few checks you can do, real basic, that you can do yourself and we’re just going to walk through. These are checks that you can look at on your new site or your existing site or, really, any site to see if they’re susceptible to duplicate content issues. The first one is “www” vs non-“www”. What I mean by that is, if you enter your domain name into the browser, “www.example.com”, and you enter it without the “www”, so just “example.com”, and both of those pages load, there could be issues with duplicate content there. What you want to do is select which protocol that you want to deliver your website through, whether with the “www” or without the “www”, and make sure that you redirect the one you don’t want to the other one, so it’s always delivering the exact same way. The second one is “http” vs “https”. The “https” is for those sites that use an SSL certificate, so they want to deliver their content securely and in an encrypted way. If you’re using an SSL certificate to deliver some of your content, you want to make sure that pages that have the “https” protocol aren’t loading the non-“https” version as well. You want to make sure that they’re being redirected: only delivering it in the same way every time. Similar to the “www” vs non-“www”, you want to make sure that you’re only using one of these protocols. Again, does one redirect to the other? Or do they both load? If they both load, you could be susceptible again. The homepage is a unique situation where there’s actually a handful of different ways to load the homepage of a website that you don’t really think about whenever you’re building. Some examples are if you just hit “www”, so that’s pretty basic. Also, if you add a slash at the end¸ it could load the same page. Or without the “www”, so we’ve already kind of talked about some of these. But then there’s some more. What if you add “index.html” at the end? By default, homepages are generally named “index”, so if you just access the html file directly, does it load? Well, sometimes there’s reference with just an “htm”, so that could be another way to load the homepage. Then, finally, maybe you’re using a programming language like php, so you could access it “index.php”. Some websites could actually load the homepage, in this case, six different ways. Google sees this as six different pages even though it’s only one page on your website. You want to make sure that all of these are redirecting back to the one way that you want that content delivered, which will most likely be the top example on this list. Trailing slashes, so we touched on these in the last one. Anytime you have a URL on your site, there’s the possibility of just adding a trailing slash on the end, and it loads the exact same content. And again, search engines are going to see this as two different pages even though it’s one page on your site. For instance, maybe you have a contact page that looks like this, but if you add a slash on the end, it may load that contact page as well. Google’s going to see this as two separate pages with duplicate content. Just add a trailing slash on the end and see if it redirects back to the version without a trailing slash.

Duplicate paths. This has kind of been touched on before, as well, but, again, if there are multiple ways to access a single page on your site, the search engines are going to see that as multiple pages. Say, for example, you have a facility page on your site. There may be multiple other ways to load that, so maybe you have a query string value that says we only want to show the small sizes. That’s still all the exact same facility information. Or maybe you want to have a URL that says “state, city facility page”, or maybe you also have a facility URL directly off the route of the domain, for example: “example.com/facilty_page”. If you have all of these set up on your site, and all of these different ways to access your facility page, these are duplicate paths to get to the same page on your site, loading the same data, susceptible to duplicate content again.

8. Social Media Accounts

What is it?

I’m sure a lot of you are taking care of the social media account, but social media is just becoming more popular and powerful that any new site should really be taking advantage of this. You’ll want to make sure that you have active and up-to-date accounts on all the common social networks, so sites like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, even Youtube and LinkedIn. Make sure that your account information is all up-to-date. Try to update it as frequently as you can, post some Tweets, and some updates to Facebook.

Why is it important?

These accounts actually give some extra business validation – not only to search engines, but to potential renters, too. As the search engines crawl the internet, they’ll see your website and they’ll also see, “They’ve set up a Facebook, they’ve set up a Twitter, they took the time to actually create these other accounts on these other sites”, and they’ll say, “Well, this is probably a more valid business because they took the time, and it’s not some spam site that’s just firing up these website all over the internet.” And it will give renters an extra source of validation. If they see a Facebook page and they see you posting updates, maybe managers posting updates, they’ll feel a little more at home whenever they are renting there. Also, a lot of people are engaged in social networks. If people have problems, or questions, concerns, comments, a lot of times they’ll post these on social networks. If you’re involved with that, you’ll be able to see these and interact with the clients, as well. And then referrals. This is pretty basic. It’s just another way to get people to click on your website or to get your name out there. It’s easy, it’s free, and it doesn’t take a whole lot of time.

What can you do?

Well, besides the obvious of just setting up your site, you’ll want to create unique information for each site. As you’re building your Facebook page and your Twitter page, don’t just copy and paste your bio or your about us between the two pages. Create that unique content between. Spend the little extra time to do that. It doesn’t really have any benefit to have the exact same content on each. This may sound a little obvious but, if there’s any spot to add a link, whether it’s just a text box or they’re actually asking for a link, put your URL in there. People are going to see that and it’ll give them that extra way to visit your site or get that extra lead to go to your site. Even though most of these links are probably no-follow, which means you won’t get any link juice from it, they’ll still give referral traffic as well. Get your account verified. Social networks like Google+ allow you to do a few extra steps to verify that you are who you say you are. Once you get verified and confirmed, you’ll get a few extra benefits, maybe some extra information displayed in the Google search results. It’s worth the extra effort. So all this extra effort you put into these can be worth it because it’s going to drive some extra traffic, extra awareness, and extra value to your company.

9. Phone Number Porting

What is it?

This is another item that’s a little more specific to the self storage industry. This is going to be for those owners that are using phone number tracking to track the phone calls on their website. This is a step for those that’s going to involve porting those numbers from one carrier to another. A lot of people use different phone tracking services and carriers, but a lot of times web development companies will want to keep all the numbers in one account in order to keep it easy to manage.

Why is it important?

That’s one reason why it’s important, is making sure all the numbers are in one account. Also, it’s a really time-consuming process to port a phone number from one carrier’s service to another carrier’s service. If you are planning on keeping tracking numbers, you want to make sure that you get involved with this porting process as soon as possible so it doesn’t delay any type of launch. This can take upwards of days, or a week, or even a couple of weeks, so don’t wait until the last minute to start porting those numbers over. As I said, it’s easy to manage phone numbers when they’re all together. Web development companies probably have accounts with hundreds of these phone numbers if they have other clients using tracking numbers. It’s good just to keep them all in one place so they’re not trying to manage accounts on a dozen different phone tracking services or software. Also, they probably have an account manager at whatever phone company that they’re working with and they can troubleshoot and call and get access to information quickly, rather than having to call a new person every time at all these other different companies.

What can you do?

First off, alert the new company that you’re going with that you are using tracking numbers and that you’re wanting to keep those. They can start talking about getting that porting process started as early as possible. If you do want to keep it, get that process started as early as possible. Again, don’t wait until the last minute. You don’t want your site launch delayed just because you don’t have those tracking numbers set up. And also, be sure not to port over your land lines. If you port over a land line, you’re going to lose that phone connection for a decent amount of time because it’s going to have to go through the porting process of to a carrier and then the porting process of back. Be sure that whenever you’re selected the numbers to port over, you’re only selecting the tracking numbers and not your land lines.

10. Landing Pages and Keywords

What is it?

This is another critical SEO item that should not be overlooked. What this means is you want to analyze what pages the users are landing on and what keywords they’re using to find your site. Things like: are they using “local storage”, are they using “boat storage” or “storage units”, are they searching by amenities? Things like that.

Why is it important?

When switching to a new site, you don’t want to lose that traffic that’s coming into your popular landing pages. There’s probably a subset of pages on your existing site that users are actually landing on, whether through Google or directly. You don’t want to have the users receive an error whenever they access the site the next time, whenever your new site goes live. A couple options: you can either keep these pages and keep the URLs the same or, like we mentioned earlier, you can use 301 redirects to say, “that landing page doesn’t exist but here’s a similar one on the new site, so we’ll go ahead and just 301 redirect all those users onto this other page that’s really similar”. Also, you don’t want to lose that keyword optimization. You’ve built up some keyword optimization on your existing site for Google and these other search engines to recognize. If you monitor those keywords, you can write that new, unique content and keep targeting those same keywords that you were targeting before in order not to lose your ranking for those particular keywords in the search engines.

What can you do?

You can use Google Analytics and Google Webmaster to view this data. They have a landing page report, actually, that you can run that will show you all the landing pages that users are coming in on and what keywords they’re using to access those pages. That one report right there will give you a really good idea of the pages that you need to focus on. Then you can also, in Google Analytics, monitor the click-through on keywords. You can see what keywords the users are searching in Google to find your site. You want to make sure you keep targeting those so you don’t lose the optimization that you’ve already built up for those particular keywords.

Upcoming Webinars

That brings us to the conclusion of the ten things. Before we get into some Q&A, a couple notes here. We do have some additional upcoming webinars. There’s one here on July 17th at 2pm. It’s a special webinar that we’re going to give a WebReady tour of one of our products. Then, on August 1st, we’re going to have another webinar. We’re going to start discussing lead-tracking benefits and return on investment on your lead tracking.

Q&A

Alright, again, thank you for joining. We look forward to seeing you guys again at a future StorageAhead webinar. Again, if you have any questions or comments, feel free to contact us anytime at the phone number and email on the screen. Thanks!

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